Information for the Year 2005

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  • Worldwide aid pours in to help the eleven Asian countries devastated by the Dec. 26, 2004, tsunami (Jan.).
  • Mahmoud Abbas wins presidency of the Palestinian Authority in a landslide. This is the first presidential election for Palestinians since 1996 (Jan. 9).
  • The Sudanese government and Southern rebels sign a peace agreement to end a 20-year civil war that has claimed the lives of two million people (Jan. 9).
  • Iraqi elections to select a 275-seat National Assembly take place despite threats of violence (Jan. 30)
  • Pope John Paul II Dies (April 2). Benedict XVI becomes the next pope (April 24).
  • The Syrian military, stationed in Lebanon for 29 years, withdraws (April 26).
  • Tony Blair becomes first Labour Party prime minister to win three successive terms, but his party loses a large number of seats in the elections (May 5).
  • Former Teheran mayor Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, a hard-line conservative, wins Iran's presidential election with 62% of the vote. He defiantly pursues Iran's nuclear ambitions over the course of his first year in office (June 24).
  • London hit by Islamic terrorist bombings, killing 52 and wounding about 700. It is Britain's worst attack since World War II (July 7).
  • Pentagon assessment finds Iraq's police force is, at best, "partially capable" of fighting the country's insurgency. The U.S.'s eventual withdrawal plan hinges upon Iraqi security forces replacing U.S. soldiers: "As Iraqis stand up, Americans will stand down," President Bush had stated (July 20).
  • Israel begins evacuating about 8,000 Israeli settlers from the Gaza Strip, which has been occupied by Israel for the last 38 years (Aug. 15).
  • Millions of Iraqi voters ratify a new constitution (Oct. 15).
  • Former Iraqi president Saddam Hussein goes on trial for the killing of 143 people in the town of Dujail, Iraq, in 1982 (Oct 19).
  • Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf becomes Africa's first woman elected head of state (Nov. 11).
  • Israeli prime minister Ariel Sharon quits as head of the Likud Party, which he founded, to start a new, more centrist organization, called Kadima (Nov. 21).
  • About 11 million Iraqis (70% of the country's registered voters) turn out to select their first permanent Parliament since the overthrow of Saddam Hussein (Dec. 15).
  • Population:   6.4 billion
  • Nobel Peace Prize:  Mohamed ElBaradei (Egypt) and International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
  • George W. Bush is officially sworn in for his second term as president (Jan. 20).
  • In his State of the Union address, President Bush announces his plan to reform Social Security (Feb. 2). Despite months of campaigning, his plan receives only a lukewarm reception..
  • Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor announces her retirement (July 1).
  • President Bush signs the Central American Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA), which will remove trade barriers between the U.S. and Costa Rica, the Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, and Nicaragua (Aug. 2).
  • Hurricane Katrina wreaks catastrophic damage on the Gulf coast; more than 1,000 die and millions are left homeless. Americans are shaken not simply by the magnitude of the disaster but by how ill-prepared all levels of government are in its aftermath.
  • Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist, who served on the U.S. Supreme Court for 33 years, dies (Sept. 3).
  • John Roberts becomes 17th chief justice of the U.S. Supreme Court (Sept 22).
  • Another major hurricane, Rita, ravages the Gulf coast (Sept. 23).
  • House majority leader Tom Delay is accused of conspiring to violate Texas's election laws. He steps aside from his House leadership position (Sept. 28).
  • President Bush nominates conservative judge Samuel Alito to replace retiring Justice Sandra Day O'Connor on the Supreme Court (Oct. 31).
  • President:  George W. Bush
  • Vice President:  Richard Cheney
  • Population:   296 million
  • Life expectancy:  78.3 years
  • US GDP (2001 dollars):  $12,154 Billion
  • Federal spending:  $2,470 billion
  • Federal debt:   $7,933 billion
  • Median Household Income(current dollars): $66,050
  • Consumer Price Index:   195.3
  • Unemployment:   5.1%
  • Cost of a first-class stamp:   $0.37
  • Super Bowl  New England Patriots defeated Philadelphia Flyers(SCORE 24–21)
  • World Series of Baseball  Chicago White Sox defeated Houston Astros
  • National Basketball Association Championship  San Antonio defeated Detroit
  • National Hockey League Stanley Cup  Not awarded due to the cancellation of the 2004-05 season.
  • Women Wimbledon Tennis  Venus Williams defeated Lindsay Davenport (4–6, 7–6 [7–4], 9–7)
  • Men Wimbledon Tennis   Roger Federer defeated Andy Roddick (6–2, 7–6 [7–2], 6–4)
  • Kentucky Derby Horse Race Champion  Giacomo
  • National College Athletic Association Basketball Championship  North Carolina defeated Illinois (SCORE 75-70)
  • National College Athletic Association Football Champions   Texas (13-0-0)
  • Gwen Stefani's "Hollaback Girl" was the most downloaded song of the year. It was downloaded more than 1.7 million times.
  • More than 350 million digital songs were purchased in 2005. It marks an increase of 150% from 2004, according to Nielsen SoundScan. However, 654 million albums were sold in 2005, a decrease of 3.9% from 2004.
  • In July, millions of people attended Live 8, free concerts in nine countries—South Africa and each of the Group of Eight nations—to promote increased aid to Africa.
  • Moviegoers spent $8,945,298,267 at the box office in 2005, 5.2% less than in 2004, according to Exhibitor Relations.
  • Peter Jennings, anchor of ABC's World News Tonight, died in August. He was replaced by co-anchor Bob Woodruff and Elizabeth Vargas.
  • Academy Award, Best Picture:  Million Dollar Baby
  • Grammy Award - Record of the Year  Here We Go Again by Ray Charles and Norah Jones
  • Emmy Award - Best Television Comedy   Everybody Loves Raymond - CBS
  • Miss America:  Deidre Downs, Birmingham, Alabama
  • Cancer replaces heart disease as No. 1 cause of death for people ages 85 and under. Number of deaths from both, however, have fallen (Jan. 19).
  • After a 6-month, 83-million-mile journey, NASA's Deep Impact spacecraft hits comet named Tempel 1. After our solar system formed, comets were believed to have been created out of the remaining dust and gases. By blasting a crater into the surface of Tempel 1 and uncovering its pristine interior, scientists hope to examine the primordial remnants of our solar system to gain insight into its formation (July 4).
  • Astronomers at the California Institute of Technology find a rocky, icy planet they believe is larger than Pluto and may in fact be another planet (July 29).
  • Scientists discover the skull of a sea-dwelling crocodile that lived 135 million years ago. Unlike other crocodiles, it has a short snout (Nov. 11).

 

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